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GOP-Rich Kids Are Worth More Than Poor Kids
Last comment by shannalat 1 year, 9 months ago.

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Update, Friday July 25: On Friday, the House passed Rep. Lynn Jenkins' (R-Ks.) child tax credit legislation, which would expand the credit for upper-middle class American families. The bill received the support of 212 Republican and 25 Democrats.

On Friday, the House will vote on a Republican bill that ignores an expiring tax credit for millions of low-income families, while handing one to better-off Americans.

The bill, introduced by Rep. Lynn Jenkins (R-Ks.), changes the way the federal child tax credit works by raising the eligibility cap for married couples. At the same time, the legislation would allow a 2009 child tax credit increase for low-income families to expire at the end of 2017. Here's how that would play out in the coming years. A married couple with two children that bring in $160,000 a year would get a new annual tax cut of $2,200, according to an analysis by the left-leaning Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP). A single mother with two kids who makes $14,500 a year would lose $1,725 annually.

"The big winners would be the more-affluent families who would become newly eligible for the [child tax credit]," tax experts at the CBPP noted Tuesday. "The losers would be millions of low-income families who are doing exactly what policymakers often say they want these people to do—working, even at low-wage jobs."

The 2009 law that increased the child tax credit for poor families did so by lowering the income level required for a partial credit to $3,000 and reducing the annual income required for a full credit to $16,333. If it expires, 6 million children and roughly 400,000 veterans and military families would lose all or part of their child tax credit.

A spokesman for Jenkins explains that the reason the bill ends up extending the child tax credit to wealthier Americans is that it gets rid of the marriage penalty, which treats a married couple's total income differently than the sum of two separate incomes. The way the child tax credit is currently structured, a single person making up to $75,000 is eligible for a full credit. But for a married couple filing jointly, full credit eligibility cuts off at $110,000 instead of at $150,000, the couple's combined total income. Jenkins' bill moves the full credit cut-off to $150,000. (As income increases above these thresholds, the child tax credit phases out slowly. Under Jenkins' bill, for instance, a couple with two kids could still get the credit if they make up to $205,000.)

Jenkins' office adds that the reason that the legislation does not extend the low-income child tax credit increase is that this provision doesn't expire until the end of 2017, and future legislation can address it.

But a Democratic aide familiar with the bill says this justification is disingenuous, adding that if GOPers wanted to extend the low-income provision, they would. All 22 Republicans on the House ways and means committee voted for Jenkins' bill, while all 15 Dems on the committee voted against it. "[Republicans] can say whatever they want," the aide says. But "they are prioritizing making permanent [all the tax provisions] that they want to be permanent, and getting rid of everything else." For instance, Republicans are already pushing to extend another tax measure that expires at the end of 2017 that is designed to help parents and students pay for college expenses.

The Democratic staffer adds that if Jenkins' bill were to become law, and the low-income provision were left hanging on its own, it would be very difficult to "galvanize Congress into action" to pass a separate extension for the measure. "What carries it along is that it's bundled together," he says. Chuck Marr, one of the authors of the CBPP study, agrees that the most obvious way for the House to extend the low-income measure would be to include it in Jenkins' bill.

Even if the legislation passes the House, the bill—which would cost the government $115 billion over ten years—has little chance in the Democratic-controlled Senate.

http://www.motherjones.com/mojo/2014/07/republican-house-child-tax-credit-bill


Latest Activity: Jul 25, 2014 at 2:51 PM


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shannalat commented on Monday, Jul 28, 2014 at 14:27 PM

“To compel a man to furnish funds for the propagation of ideas he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical.”
― Thomas Jefferson

Reading this comment and any article concerning the tax code at all level of the United States government also makes me sad. The tax code on the federal level looks like a set of rules written in a meth induced haze by a group of lunatics. It is almost impossible to enforce and when it is enforced it is usually enforced to "get" someone on a technicality (see Al Capone) The code is usually never properly improved and when it is improved it is done to help one group and not the other (see this post) Now it is being done to help the married families, previously it was done to help the homeowners, and before that business owners.
A fair tax plan (because their is a need for taxes like it or not) has to start from the ground up with the way taxes are collected and spent.
what our politicians are arguing over is not reform, it is tweaking and changing and who should or shouldn't get benefits

HMJC commented on Tuesday, Jul 29, 2014 at 08:05 AM

I do not concur with making it harder for low income families however; I am not opposed to the middle class getting a break as they have financed pretty much of his low income initiatives. It is what it is and there will be contentious rhetoric on this topic.

shannalat commented on Tuesday, Jul 29, 2014 at 08:35 AM

see that is it right there. If I can get you to argue about who and howa much to tax then I can continue to tax and raise that tax and waste that tax and this is the system we have.
Also locally is the way to go. We can see on a much smaller level tax abuse waste and tyranny at the hands of short sighted leadership with no regard to the families they marginalize through their taxes.
Local change should happen. I just finished reading an article
http://coastalcourier.com/archives/68...
on the Coastal Couriers website concerning the SPLOST or the sales tax voted in by the public at the ballot box. This November the public will get the chance to vote for or against taxes and the article among other things (when you get the chance you should read this article)
points out that
"One thing that voters should keep in mind, however, is that if the SPLOST referendum fails to pass, property owners will almost certainly see an increase in tax rates"
So basically locally we can vote but we will be taxed pretty much no matter what we think or feel. That can't be right can it?
Jimmy is right locally we have to fix taxes and they way they are spent.

shannalat commented on Tuesday, Jul 29, 2014 at 10:22 AM

me either.
I find the democrats to be ineffective in the long term and the republicans to be at most times to effective.
I would be a libertarian, however I understand the need for a governing authority, and some of the rhetoric from the libertarian camp is just well nonsense

HMJC commented on Wednesday, Jul 30, 2014 at 08:07 AM

and the Race Card is a copout

shannalat commented on Wednesday, Jul 30, 2014 at 08:33 AM

I have seen the democrats use class warfare as a tactic. Race not so much.

The class warfare one is something I cannot get behind though. Should a man or a woman be punished for his or her success? Of course not. That being said should someones success give a man or a woman the right to harm the unsuccessful?
Of course not.
The problem with class warfare is that all of the rich are not the same and all of the poor are not the same.

shannalat commented on Friday, Aug 08, 2014 at 15:03 PM

we are living with the largest income gap in the history of the United States. Now why is that?
and how do you fix that?
This is were the politics begin. At least I hope.
why.... lack of education and opportunity . Not a lack of resources.

how a proper education and better access for everyone regardless of class.
So why is a college education not offered like a elementary or high school education?
here is a great story in the Washington Post that outlines how the US could provide a free college education
http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinion...
Where is this debate at?


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